SWEDISH GRACE: 100 YEARS OF SWEDISH ART AND DESIGN : CELEBRATING CARL LARSSON AND ANDERS ZORN

Monday, September 9, 2019 (All day)

Time:      10:30 for 10.45 – 3:30

Venue:     Art Workers’ Guild, 6 Queen Square, Bloomsbury WC1N 3AT

Tutor:      Anne Anderson

Cost:       £36 (including coffee but excluding lunch) 

The reopening of the National Museum of Fine Arts of Sweden will provide an opportunity to celebrate the centenaries of Carl Larsson (died 1919) and Anders Zorn (died 1920). While Zorn could be compared to John Singer Sargent, with his bravado portraits in the grand manner, Larsson has acquired a wider fame as the founding father of IKEA.   Larsson exemplifies Swedish Grace, a desire to live in simple but beautiful surroundings.  Larsson and his wife Karen , who bore eight children, created an idyllic home at Lilla Hyttnäs, in Sundborn, Dalarna.

After establishing his reputation as an international portrait painter Zorn, from Mora, Dalarna, returned to his native land to create Zorngården. Like Larsson’s Lilla Hyttnäs, Zorn’s studio-house expresses the architectural freedom of the day, drawing on the Arts and Crafts ethos and folk art traditions.  Fearing the loss of these traditions Zorn created Gammelgården  a collection of around 40 timber houses that he bought and moved to make sure that the old art of building such houses would not be forgotten.

The modernist style made its breakthrough in Sweden at the Stockholm International Exhibition (1930).  Svenskt Tenn (founded 1924) is a design store that can be compared to Liberty’s of Regent Street, Swedish Modern embraced bold contrasts in materials, colours and printsIts lead designer Josef Frank was inspired by the patterns of William Morris.

Contact: susanbranfield@waitrose.com

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